Glaucoma

Glaucoma Causes in Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) breaks down diseases into patterns of imbalance that contribute to or cause bodily malfunctions. In the case of glaucoma, there are many possible contributing factors that lead to vision loss due to a buildup of fluid pressure that creates optical nerve damage. While Chinese medicine can be beneficial for those with glaucoma, it is important to maintain a working relationship with an ophthalmologist and monitor your condition. For best outcomes using self-care, combine associated Acupressure Sticks™ to acu-points, organic herbstopical remedies, and good lifestyle practices. 

herb leaves

Acupressure Points for Glaucoma

Learn Everything You Need to Know About How to Use Acu-Points Linked Here!essential oils for acupressure

 

herb leaves

Symptoms of Imbalance Causing Glaucoma in Chinese Medicine

Liver Imbalances and Glaucoma

One underlying theory in Chinese medicine is that “the Liver opens to the eyes” as the eyes are the sense organs that relate to the Wood Element in Chinese medicine. Consider our organic Free and Easy Wanderer formula!

Liver Qi Stagnation and Glaucomaliver detox remedy with essential oils

Liver congestion contributes to glaucoma in a number of ways according to Chinese medicine:

Liver – Kidney Yin Deficiency and Glaucoma

This pattern is common with slow onset of open angle glaucoma seen with aging as Yin is consumed and becomes scarcer with age. Here are a few ways that Yin influences eye health:

  • 1st - Yin is cooling in nature and is necessary to keep the Liver soothed.
  • 2nd - The Liver stores nourishing Blood necessary to maintain eye health, and Blood is Yin in nature.

The Kidney energetic organ system is the original source of Yin of the body and would be indicated with Liver Yin Deficiency.  This pattern would likely demonstrate some of the other patterns of Yin Deficiency possibly including dryness or thirst at night. Consider our organic Yin Valley formula!

Qi – Yang Deficiency and Glaucoma

Adequate Qi is necessary to maintain organ health and sense organ health.

Other patterns of Qi Deficiency would also be apparent, possibly with signs of Internal Dampness. This is a very common indication with glaucoma.Consider our organic Yin Valley formula along with our Ancestor Treasure formula!

Liver Yang Rising Creating Windinternal wind essential oils foot bath

When Liver Qi Stagnation is not properly treated, the condition worsens, the Liver continues to heat up, and Liver Fire results. If you imagine that you are sitting next to a campfire it will not take long to understand that heat rises. As the heat from the fire rises you can imagine seeing the smoke begin to swirl as the fire produces “Wind”. This is a basic law of nature that can manifest within your body just as it does in nature.

Wind tends to be erratic, and this type of glaucoma might be seen with a sudden onset, headache, eye pain, blurred vision, or dizziness such as seen with closed angle glaucoma. This would likely initially be an emergency situation.

Phlegm-Fire and Glaucoma

When Liver Fire combines with Dampness due to Spleen Qi Deficiency, Phlegm-Fire results with possible indications of red eyes, confusion, and angry outbursts.

According to the Center for Disease Control, the leading causes of blindness and low vision in the United States are primarily age-related eye diseases such as age-related glaucoma. Eye drops are often administered to control eye pressure thus lessening optical nerve damage in western medicine; unfortunately, there is no known cure for glaucoma in western medicine, as is true for most degenerative health condition due to aging. Herbal therapy is a viable option with few possible side effects that should be considered with the guidance of your doctor.

herb leaves

References 

Law SK, Li T. Acupuncture for glaucoma. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;5(5):CD006030. Published 2013 May 31. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD006030.pub3

Rhee 2001. Rhee DJ, Katz LJ, Spaeth GL, Myers JS. Complementary and alternative medicine for glaucoma. Survey of Ophthalmology. 2001;46(1):43–55.

Rhee 2002. Rhee DJ, Spaeth GL, Myers JS, Steinmann WC, Augsburger JJ, Shatz LJ, et al. Prevalence of the use of complementary and alternative medicine for glaucoma. Ophthalmology. 2002;109(3):438–43. [PubMed[Google Scholar]

Leszczynska A, Ramm L, Spoerl E, Pillunat LE, Terai N. The short-term effect of acupuncture on different ocular blood flow parameters in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma: a randomized, clinical study. Clin Ophthalmol. 2018;12:1285-1291. Published 2018 Jul 19. doi:10.2147/OPTH.S170396

Sagara 2006. Sagara Y, Fuse N, Seimiva M, Yokokura S, Watanabe K, Nakazawa T, et al. Visual function with acupuncture tested by visual evoked potential. The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2006;209(3):235–41.